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Organic Habanada Sweet Snacking Pepper
Organic Habanada Sweet Snacking Pepper
Organic Habanada Sweet Snacking Pepper


 
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Habanada is our favorite pepper, without hesitation. We've tasted nothing else like it. Luscious divinity. My first bite I'll never forget: I couldn't help but bite gingerly, expecting the fire of Habanero. But then the revelation of impossibly floral, tropical sweetness, without even a hint of heat. Divine! Michael Mazourek, who'd been selecting this variety for over a decade, laughed and encouraged us to eat the whole thing, seeds and all. Indeed, that is the way. Savoring that first Habanada pepper was one of my favorite experiences of exploding expectation and imagination, especially in food. Enjoy the videos below!


pepper, habanada:


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Organic Habanda Sweet Snacking Pepper

Habanada is our favorite pepper, without hesitation. We've tasted nothing else like it. Luscious divinity.

My first bite I'll never forget: I couldn't help but bite gingerly, expecting the fire of Habanero. But then the revelation of impossibly floral, tropical sweetness, without even a hint of heat. Divine! Michael Mazourek, who'd been selecting this variety for over a decade, laughed and encouraged us to eat the whole thing, seeds and all. Indeed, that is the way. Savoring that first Habanada pepper was one of my favorite experiences of exploding expectation and imagination, especially in food.

Once they begin to produce, Habanada is immensely abundant; expect to harvest at least a pint a week. The flavor and sweetness of Habanada develops as they ripen from lime green to fluorescent orange. We love to pick them fully orange and enjoy them whole, seeds and all. Just before the first frost we'll harvest all the remaining green fruits and sear them with salt and pepper for our final toast to fresh Habanada and look forward to the next season.

The plants themselves are vigorous and are remarkably productive in average garden soil. With too much compost Habanada becomes tall and lush without putting much energy into fruit production, so be sure to not over-fertilize. This is one of many reasons why breeding for organic production is so vital and why a portion of each sale will go directly back to Dr. Mazourek at Cornell to continue his extraordinary work in public plant breeding.

Before you grow your own, know this: Habanada is difficult to germinate, preferring your heat mat (we share ones we love here) nice and toasty, ideally 85 F.

But don't be daunted. Their unmistakable, unforgettable flavor is so extraordinarily worth it.

Sow Seeds & Sing Songs,


& the whole Fruition Crew


75 days to green fruit

100 days to orange fruit

Capsicum chinense

Habanada: Our Favorite Sweet Pepper
How to Grow an Ocean of Habanada Peppers
How to Eat a Habanada Pepper

Average Rating: Average Rating: 4.5 of 5 4.5 of 5 Total Reviews: 28 Write a review »

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
4 of 5 November 20, 2019
Reviewer: Martha DeLarm from RIPARIUS, NY United States  
I wasn't taken by their weird flavor - but they were prolific.

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  0 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
3 of 5 November 15, 2019
Reviewer: John Neuhauser from South Burlington, VT United States  


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4 of 5 Decent, but didn't sell well November 4, 2019
Reviewer: Melissa Driscoll from Kenyon, MN United States  
I like the pepper but had a hard time getting my wholesaler to buy it, even though they requested it.

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4 of 5 Delicious and Versatile Sweet pepper! October 29, 2019
Reviewer: Bjorn Bergman from Viroqua, WI United States  
Habanada peppers are so delicious and fun! The peppers look terrifying (like a habanero) but are sweet and fruity when perfectly ripe. I ate most of mine fresh in meals. I have also used them in fermented hot sauce to add fruitiness without the heat. They worked great.

The only downside is that you need a long growing season to get all the peppers to ripeness. I am in growing zone 4B and I would say 1/3 of the peppers weren't ripe yet when I got my first frost around October 8.

But don't let that stop you. They are worth growing just for the taste and versatility.

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  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
5 of 5 Habanadas, revisited January 5, 2019
Reviewer: Rebekah Rice from New Scotland, NY  
I reviewed these two years ago, when they proved to be the best tasting no-heat Habanero that we trialed at Nine Mile Farm.  Since then, my sales to ONE chef have made Habanada become the largest grossing crop that we grow.  I wanted especially to weigh in now because this year our other peppers did really badly with all the rain.  The Habanadas, which were really late, were unbelievably productive.  Fortunately, the chef I sell to pickles them, and doesn't care about timing much.  I'd say: start in February, put quart pots of plants out in late May, harvest in September and October, and count your blessings!  It's a great variety.

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