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Planting Ideas for Each Month of the Year

One of the things we love most about living in beautiful upstate New York is the variety of seasons we get to experience each year. Our temperatures and environmental conditions in the Northeast are quite dynamic, and as all gardeners know, seeds that grow in the fall won’t necessarily fare as well in the spring. We’ve organized our certified organic seed catalog into the varieties that are ideal for planting each month of the year, so you can take the guesswork out of planning what vegetables and flowers to plant now. Bookmark this page and continue visiting us for monthly organic gardening ideas!

The best seeds to plant now are those that will thrive during each month’s unique conditions, bringing the spirit of the season to your table. We hope you and your customers will enjoy our selections and find them just as delicious and dependable as we do each year.

  • January

    Have you grown fresh greens on your winter windowsill? We do! Although the light is too little to support large (and especially fruiting) plants, there is plenty of light to inspire basil, lettuce, arugula, kale, cilantro and more than a dozen other varieties to grow into sweet baby greens. Here are two considerations for growing abundant greens all winter:

    -A south-facing window is often enough light to enjoy microgreens & small baby greens throughout the winter. With supplemental light it is easy to get larger plants that re-grow quickly. For lighting there are three considerations: right color, right intensity and right duration. Fluorescent lights make it affordable to achieve all three! If you see your plants getting leggy & leaning toward the light either eat them small or consider supplemental light for them.

    -Spacing is one of the finer arts of gardening; spacing (and timing) is the only difference between baby leaf and head lettuce. For example, we sow Flashy Trout Back Lettuce at 2-4 seeds per inch for baby greens and 6 seeds per foot thinned to 1 for full heads of its beautiful, buttery romaine. If we sowed more densely, each plant would quickly grow tall from the competition but they would be spindly and stressed, losing their sugars and tenderness quickly. One of the keys to growing successful winter greens is paying close attention to plant spacing, erring on the side of space so each plant has optimum sun exposure.

  • February

    Have you grown fresh greens on your winter windowsill? We do! Although the light is too little to support large (and especially fruiting) plants, there is plenty of light to inspire basil, lettuce, arugula, kale, cilantro and more than a dozen other varieties to grow into sweet baby greens. Here are two considerations for growing abundant greens all winter:

    -A south-facing window is often enough light to enjoy microgreens & small baby greens throughout the winter. With supplemental light it is easy to get larger plants that re-grow quickly. For lighting there are three considerations: right color, right intensity and right duration. Fluorescent lights make it affordable to achieve all three! If you see your plants getting leggy & leaning toward the light either eat them small or consider supplemental light for them.

    -Spacing is one of the finer arts of gardening; spacing (and timing) is the only difference between baby leaf and head lettuce. For example, we sow Flashy Trout Back Lettuce at 2-4 seeds per inch for baby greens and 6 seeds per foot thinned to 1 for full heads of its beautiful, buttery romaine. If we sowed more densely, each plant would quickly grow tall from the competition but they would be spindly and stressed, losing their sugars and tenderness quickly. One of the keys to growing successful winter greens is paying close attention to plant spacing, erring on the side of space so each plant has optimum sun exposure.
  • March

    Have you grown fresh greens on your winter windowsill? We do! Although the light is too little to support large (and especially fruiting) plants, there is plenty of light to inspire basil, lettuce, arugula, kale, cilantro and more than a dozen other varieties to grow into sweet baby greens. Here are two considerations for growing abundant greens all winter:

    -A south-facing window is often enough light to enjoy microgreens & small baby greens throughout the winter. With supplemental light it is easy to get larger plants that re-grow quickly. For lighting there are three considerations: right color, right intensity and right duration. Fluorescent lights make it affordable to achieve all three! If you see your plants getting leggy & leaning toward the light either eat them small or consider supplemental light for them.

    -Spacing is one of the finer arts of gardening; spacing (and timing) is the only difference between baby leaf and head lettuce. For example, we sow Flashy Trout Back Lettuce at 2-4 seeds per inch for baby greens and 6 seeds per foot thinned to 1 for full heads of its beautiful, buttery romaine. If we sowed more densely, each plant would quickly grow tall from the competition but they would be spindly and stressed, losing their sugars and tenderness quickly. One of the keys to growing successful winter greens is paying close attention to plant spacing, erring on the side of space so each plant has optimum sun exposure.
  • August

    August is the perfect time to sow the seeds of fall, winter and spring eating.  The first week of August is your final window to plant dwarf peas (fall peas are the sweetest!) and your final succession of summer squash and cucumbers (especially ones with good disease resistance like Success PM Summer Squash and Silver Slicer Cucumber) as well as beets, carrots, broccoli and beans.  Mid-August is when we plant kale, chard, lettuce, salad and mesclun mixes (including arugula!) as well as cilantro and our final succession of basil; these crops will grow to full size by the time nights grow cold.  Late August through mid-September we plant all these same crops but anticipate harvesting them as young rather than full-size.  These plantings will actually grow more tender and sweet with frost!  If you love greens as we do, now is your time.  You have your choice of the classics (kale, chard, lettuce, spinach, arugula) as well as lots of more esoteric but utterly delectable leaves (mache, ruby streaks, vivid choi, chervil, cress) that bring diverse flavor and color to your fall and winter garden.  Be adventurous!  Experiment widely!  This is why we regionally adapt all our varieties :)
  • November

    Have you grown fresh greens on your winter windowsill? We do! Although the light is too little to support large (and especially fruiting) plants, there is plenty of light to inspire basil, lettuce, arugula, kale, cilantro and more than a dozen other varieties to grow into sweet baby greens. Here are two considerations for growing abundant greens all winter:

    -A south-facing window is often enough light to enjoy microgreens & small baby greens throughout the winter. With supplemental light it is easy to get larger plants that re-grow quickly. For lighting there are three considerations: right color, right intensity and right duration. Fluorescent lights make it affordable to achieve all three! If you see your plants getting leggy & leaning toward the light either eat them small or consider supplemental light for them.

    -Spacing is one of the finer arts of gardening; spacing (and timing) is the only difference between baby leaf and head lettuce. For example, we sow Flashy Trout Back Lettuce at 2-4 seeds per inch for baby greens and 6 seeds per foot thinned to 1 for full heads of its beautiful, buttery romaine. If we sowed more densely, each plant would quickly grow tall from the competition but they would be spindly and stressed, losing their sugars and tenderness quickly. One of the keys to growing successful winter greens is paying close attention to plant spacing, erring on the side of space so each plant has optimum sun exposure.
  • December

    Have you grown fresh greens on your winter windowsill? We do! Although the light is too little to support large (and especially fruiting) plants, there is plenty of light to inspire basil, lettuce, arugula, kale, cilantro and more than a dozen other varieties to grow into sweet baby greens. Here are two considerations for growing abundant greens all winter:

    -A south-facing window is often enough light to enjoy microgreens & small baby greens throughout the winter. With supplemental light it is easy to get larger plants that re-grow quickly. For lighting there are three considerations: right color, right intensity and right duration. Fluorescent lights make it affordable to achieve all three! If you see your plants getting leggy & leaning toward the light either eat them small or consider supplemental light for them.

    -Spacing is one of the finer arts of gardening; spacing (and timing) is the only difference between baby leaf and head lettuce. For example, we sow Flashy Trout Back Lettuce at 2-4 seeds per inch for baby greens and 6 seeds per foot thinned to 1 for full heads of its beautiful, buttery romaine. If we sowed more densely, each plant would quickly grow tall from the competition but they would be spindly and stressed, losing their sugars and tenderness quickly. One of the keys to growing successful winter greens is paying close attention to plant spacing, erring on the side of space so each plant has optimum sun exposure.
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Organic Shintokiwa Cucumber Organic Shintokiwa Cucumber

Extraordinary sweetness, crunch & productivity.